Finalists

2014 Finalists

The 2014 Sustainable Urban Mobility Plans (SUMP) Award attracted 17 applications from 10 countries. The three finalists vying for the Award are Bremen (Germany), Dresden (Germany) and Ghent (Belgium). The winner will be announced at a joint European Mobility Week-SUMP Award ceremony on 23 March 2015 in Brussels, Belgium.

The winner: Bremen

Contact person: Jan Bembennek

Germany

In addition to excellent planning and the early provision of tools for monitoring and evaluation, Bremen impressed the jury with its strong stakeholder involvement during the evaluation process. This includes cooperation with peer cities and networks and international cooperation. Bremen has made remarkable efforts to continuously ’learn the lesson‘, to strengthen its success stories and to avoid potential failure in the next round of transport planning. Bremen communicates ’lessons learnt‘ to stakeholders through working groups with those concerned, political debates within the relevant committees and internet forum activities for citizens. Bremen's next – and highly relevant – challenge includes feeding evaluation results back into the public debate and the SUMP.

Visit the website

Finalist factsheet

Dresden

Contact person: Kerstin Burggraf

Germany

The city of Dresden has initiated a high quality process to monitor and evaluate its SUMP. It is following a highly systematic approach for the development of a monitoring and evaluation framework while making use of European guidance. Dresden is strong in its provision of tools and has carefully selected relevant indicators. In addition to assessing SUMP measures, the framework also covers the evaluation of the SUMP planning process, which Dresden is currently implementing for the first time. This includes conducting a consultation of all SUMP planning bodies and partners on their experiences, as well as carrying out an assessment and providing feedback on the entire planning cycle that led to the SUMP's formal adoption in November 2014.

Visit the website

Finalist factsheet

Ghent

Contact person: Maja Meirlaen

Belgium

Thanks to continuous work during the last 30 years, the city of Ghent has built up a thorough system of SUMP practice including monitoring and evaluation. With institutions and processes in place, valuable evaluation experience has also been gained through participation in a number of European co-funded projects such as CIVITAS and QUEST, which has supported a continuous learning process through exchanges on successes and failures experienced by other cities. Outstanding data collection from local authorities and other relevant sources facilitates Ghent's high quality monitoring and evaluation process. Results are fed back into the planning process by adjusting measures following discussions within the city council mobility committee.

Visit the website

Finalist factsheet

Special Prize of the Jury: Thessaloniki

Contact person: Chrysa Vizmpa

Greece

In Thessaloniki, urban transport plans have been under development since the early 70s. These have been lacking, however, in robust and efficient processes paving the way towards implementation. Despite major economic and social challenges, Thessaloniki has now succeeded in drafting its first sustainable urban mobility plan, thus demonstrating its strong commitment to achieving more sustainable urban mobility. The SUMP was adopted by the council members of Thessaloniki’s public transport authority (THE PTA) in February 2014. The jury recognizes the tremendous effort that has been made by Thessaloniki in a difficult working environment, towards establishing brand-new procedures for the implementation, monitoring and evaluation of its mobility plan, and welcomes the city’s intense engagement with peers.

Visit the website

Finalist factsheet

 

2013 Finalists

The 2013 Sustainable Urban Mobility Plans (SUMP) Award attracted 21 applications from 11 countries. The three finalists vying for the Award are Rivas Vaciamadrid (Spain), Strasbourg (France) and Vitoria-Gasteiz (Spain)
The winner was announced at a joint European Mobility Week-SUMP Award ceremony on 24 March 2014 in Brussels, Belgium.

The winner: Rivas Vaciamadrid

Contact person: Jorge Romea Rodríguez

Spain

Rivas Vaciamadrid has witnessed unique growth in its population: from 500 inhabitants in 1980 to 80 000 in 2013. Although this has changed mobility patterns, 39.5 % of daily trips are still made by people commuting to Madrid. As private vehicles account for 81 % of transport related energy consumption, with its SUMP, Rivas Vaciamadrid aims to reduce this proportion while also improving road safety and reducing noise and air pollution. For example its ‘School Paths’ programme includes a municipality-wide road safety educational programme and involves specific schools in family/teacher discussions on their school’s mobility. The SUMP was drawn up following the mobility department’s extensive collaboration with related departments such as environment, safety, education and health. Additionally through cross-sector working groups, Rivas Vaciamadrid brought together municipal politicians, technical staff, environmental NGOs, transport operators and users, and local businesses, among others. The jury commended Rivas Vaciamadrid for its excellent understanding of how to take social, economic and environmental policy criteria into account in transport planning through establishing cross-sectoral working groups.

Visit the website

Finalist factsheet

Strasbourg

Contact person: Maeva Moreau

France

Strasbourg started its journey towards sustainable urban mobility in the 1990s with the reintroduction of a modern transport system. In addition to constructing an interconnected public transport system, the city also improved cycling infrastructure to combat a drop in the cycling modal share. In the 2000s an SUMP was developed with the aim of reducing car journeys and promoting multimodal transport. Strasbourg works towards these goals through actions such as: the ‘affordable fare structure’ which ensures access to public transport for households with limited income; introducing alternative fuels for buses and trams; and cross-border collaboration to extend the tram line to the German city of Kehl. Given the interrelation with other fields of competence at state, regional and local level, Strasbourg’s city transport department worked with its departments for health, economic development and urban ecology, among others, to develop its SUMP. The jury praised Strasbourg for its strong commitment to sustainability principles in its transport planning, and for translating all dimensions of sustainability – social, environmental and economic – into actions. It highlighted in particular the city’s commitment to the often neglected social dimension with its advanced public transport ticketing system.

Visit the website

Finalist factsheet

Vitoria-Gasteiz

Contact person: Juan Carlos Escudero

Spain

Growth induced challenges led Vitoria-Gasteiz to debate the city’s sustainable mobility. To enable discussion, it set up a Citizens Forum for Sustainable Mobility in 2006 and an interdepartmental coordination committee. As a result, its first SUMP was approved in 2007. The plan aimed to reorganise the traffic, free up space, improve coverage of the transport network, consolidate the network of cycle paths and set up a network of pedestrian walkways. One of the city’s key strategies to achieve these objectives is the ‘superblocks’ concept, a concept which defines urban cells within the city and only allows motorised transport on the outer streets, leaving the inner streets for pedestrians, cyclists and services. This strategy has successfully led to a higher modal share for walking. The city’s SUMP goes beyond transport and also extensively incorporates public space. Thus working groups, run by the Citizens Forum for Sustainable Mobility, also involve municipal departments such as the local police, the department of economic development, the public health unit and the environmental studies centre. Vistoria-Gasteiz’s consistent combination of transport planning with urban planning was lauded by the Jury, which particularly commended the city’s integrated efforts to reduce the adverse impact of transport on the climate and citizen’s health.

Visit the website

Finalist factsheet

 

2012 Finalists

The 2012 Sustainable Urban Mobility Plans (SUMP) Award attracted 29 applications from 12 countries. The three finalists vying for the Award were Aberdeen (UK), Ljutomer (Slovenia) and Toulouse (France).
Announced at a joint European Mobility Week-SUMP Award ceremony on 6 March 2013 in Brussels, Belgium, the 2012 SUMP Award winner is Aberdeen.

The winner: Aberdeen City Council

Contact person: Louise Napier

UK

EMW_finalistsWith an overreliance on private vehicles and a requirement for Heavy Goods Vehicles in the City to serve the oil and farming economies, it is perhaps unsurprising that Aberdeen is exceeding both EU and national air quality targets. Despite the relative wealth of the area, nearly a third of households in Aberdeen do not have access to a car and are consequently reliant on public transport services. Aberdeen’s SUMP therefore addresses social, integration, safety, environmental and economic objectives and includes a long planned traffic bypass and a focus on sustainable transport. The redistribution of commuter and non-essential HGV traffic to the bypass will free up road space in the city centre and on key corridors, and this extra space will be reassigned to forms of sustainable transport. The Plan was the result of an open and inclusive process that encompassed public workshops as well as a strong social media presence in order to elicit a wide range of views. The Jury commended this ‘outstanding participatory approach … [involving] stakeholders and citizens.’

Visit the website

Finalist factsheet

Media gallery

The Municipality of Ljutomer

Contact person: Mitja Kolbl

Slovenia

EMW_finalistsLjutomer's transport policy is facing a number of challenges including an overly car-centric approach to planning, imbalances in the use of modes of transport, decreasing use of the public transport system and freight traffic issues. The city’s SUMP therefore aims to address these issues (and others) and make Ljutomer the leading Slovenian municipality of its size in terms of sustainable urban mobility by 2016. Whilst traditional transport planning in Slovenia has been criticised for limiting citizen engagement, Ljutomer’s SUMP engaged residents at an early stage, was characterised by a compromise-focused approach and drew on European experience (e.g. CIVITAS Elan, Eltis plus etc). Activities carried out within the framework of the plan included participation in a European project to promote active modes of transport, 27 in-depth interviews with stakeholders and events such as the ‘Day of Active Mobility’ which featured bike checks, games, competitions etc. The Jury remarked that ‘Ljutomer proves that even with a limited national history in participatory planning, developing an ambitious SUMP is possible … For a small town of only 12 000, a remarkable number of actions have been undertaken.’

Visit the website

Finalist factsheet

Media gallery

Public Transport Authority of the Greater Toulouse

Contact person: Aurore Asorey

France

EMW_finalistsThe Toulouse area has seen steady growth in its population for over 30 years, resulting in an urban sprawl that reinforces traditional car usage dependencies. In addition, development of the public transport network has focused on the implementation of a metro network rather than developing a broad range of transport options. Against this background, the Greater Toulouse SUMP aims to, among other things, support car-sharing schemes, encourage the private sector to adopt Workplace Mobility Plans, introduce a global parking policy and reduce the number of traffic accidents involving ‘soft’ modes of transport such as cycling. Citizens had the chance to contribute to the Toulouse SUMP by participating in any of seven public meetings, a Mobility Conference or by submitting their opinions/questions on the ‘Dialogue’ section of a dedicated website (www.desideespourmieuxbouger.fr). Almost 370 people submitted their questions in this way and over 1500 participated during the public consultation phase. Measures taken within the framework of the SUMP include a ‘Mobility Account’ initiative which will help users to understand the impact (societal, economic etc) of particular modes of transport. The Jury remarked ‘With its long history of and experience with sustainable urban mobility planning, Toulouse demonstrates advanced and well-structured procedures in the field of sustainable urban mobility planning.’

Visit the website

Finalist factsheet

Media gallery